FAQ

1. Is it required that my family dentist schedule my appointment with the Orthodontist?

2. Why should I choose an orthodontic specialist than a general dentist to have orthodontic treatment?

3. At what age should I schedule an orthodontic screening appointment for my child?

4. Is there a fee for the initial exam?

5. How do I set up an appointment for an initial exam?

6. What will happen at the initial examination appointment?

7. What will I learn from the initial examination?

8. What is the next step after the initial exam? and how quickly can I get my braces on after the initial exam?

9. Can your office use orthodontic records already taken at another office?

10. How long is the appointment to put braces on?

11. Are there different types of braces?

12. Can I use a combination of metal braces and ceramic braces?

13. Are ceramic braces more expensive than metal braces?

14. Can teenagers use ceramic braces like most adults prefer for esthetic reasons?

15. Is the appointment for getting braces a painful or an uncomfortable one?

16. Do I need shots to get braces on? or during orthodontic treatment?

17. Do braces hurt?

18. Can I return to school they day I receive my braces?

19. Are there foods that I can not eat while I have braces?

20. How often should I brush my teeth while in braces?

21. Should I use electric toothbrush with braces? Will electric toothbrush break my braces?

22. How often will I have appointments?

23. How long will it take to complete my treatment?

24. Do braces interfere with my school activities like sports, playing an instrument or singing?

25. What is invisalign?

26. Can Invisalign treat the same problems that braces can treat?

27. How do I know if I am an Invisalign candidate?

28. Can I be treated with both braces and Invisalign simultaneously?

29. What is Propel Technology?

30. Do I need retainers after my orthodontic treatment?

31. How long do I have to wear retainers for?

32. What are my retainer type options?

33. How much will braces cost? Are financing options available? How does insurance work?

34. Do you use recycled braces?

35. Can I schedule all of my appointments after school?

36. Do you offer after 5pm appointments?

37. Can I drop my child off for an appointment?

38. Will I need to have teeth extracted for braces?

39. Will my child need an expander? Will my child need a headgear?

40. Will I need to use elastics/rubber bands during my orthodontic treatment?

41. What is an emergency appointment? How are those handled?

42. Do I need to see my family dentist while in braces or Invisalign?

43. Do teeth straighten out as they grow?

44. Can orthodontic treatment be done while a child still has baby teeth?

45. What is Phase One (Early) Treatment?

46. Will my child need full braces if he/she has phase one treatment done at a younger age?

47. Can another orthodontist continue my orthodontic treatment with the same braces if I move?

48. Is it too late to have braces if I am already an adult?

49. Can I wear braces even though I have crowns, root canals, and missing teeth?

50. Can I get my braces off before my treatment is completed?


1.Is it required that my family dentist schedule my appointment with the Orthodontist?

No, it is not. Many of our patients are referred by their family dentist, their friends or family. Yet many other patients take the initiative to schedule an examination themselves.
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2.Why should I choose an orthodontic specialist than a general dentist to have orthodontic treatment?

Teeth, and sometimes entire facial structures, are permanently changed by orthodontic treatment. It is important that the problems are correctly diagnosed, and the treatment be appropriate and properly completed. Orthodontic specialists have extensive and specialized training to do that with professional and personalized treatments.
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3.At what age should I schedule an orthodontic screening appointment for my child?

The American Association of Orthodontists recommends an orthodontic screening at age 7. By this age, several permanent teeth in most children have erupted, allowing us to effectively evaluate your orthodontic condition.
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4.Is there a fee for the initial exam?

Our initial examinations are complimentary for all your family members giving us and you an opportunity to get to know each other.
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5.How do I set up an appointment for an initial exam?

If you or your child can potentially benefit from orthodontic treatment, simply call our office, or send us an e-mail to call you. We will be happy to schedule an appointment for you. When you call to schedule your appointment, our front office staff will request some basic information from you.
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6.What will happen at the initial examination appointment?

Upon arriving, each patient and parent will be seen by the staff and doctor who will acclimate you to our office and prepare for the initial exam. As needed we may take the necessary photographs and X-rays to allow us to make a proper diagnosis. The doctor will then complete a brief, but thorough, exam after which the doctor will in great detail give her recommendation and reasoning.
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7.What will I learn from the initial examination?

There are six essential questions that we will cover during the initial examination: • Is there an orthodontic problem, and if so, what is it? . How important it is to correct the problem? • What is involved in correcting the problem? • Will any teeth need to be removed? • How long will the treatment take to complete with or without Propel technology? • How much will the treatment cost? . What your insurance coverage is? . What financing options are offered at our office?
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8.What is the next step after the initial exam? and how quickly can I get my braces on after the initial exam?

In most cases braces can go on 3 to 4 weeks after your initial examination. After your initial examination, you are two appointments away from getting your braces. First appointment involves obtaining orthodontic records which are specific orthodontic x-rays, photographs, and molds taken to confirm the treatment plan discussed at the initial exam and to rule out any potential risks that are only detectable on x-rays.
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9.Can your office use orthodontic records already taken at another office?

Yes. If the records are of good diagnostic quality and taken within a reasonable time from you initial examination with us we will gladly use them. If parts of the records need to be retaken we can do only those parts.
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10.How long is the appointment to put braces on?

This appointment is 90 minutes long. The first half of this appointment requires mostly doctor time rather than assistant time, and as such it is booked in the morning when the doctor is scheduled to be with a limited number of patients to work with. The latter part of this appointment is with our highly trained assistants and it is equally important during which time parents and patients are educated about the care of their appliances, about oral hygiene regimen and demonstrations of proper flossing and brushing, will be given written instructions on diet guidelines in order to avoid emergency situations and appliance breakage.
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11.Are there different types of braces?

Yes. In general the biggest difference in braces that distinguishes them from one another is whether they are made from metal or cermaics. Both metal and ceramic braces are attached to the teeth and are not removable, and they can accomplish the same treatment goals. However, ceramic braces are tooth colored rendering them much more invisible and esthetic. Otherwise all braces for all intensive purposes work the same way.
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12.Can I use a combination of metal braces and ceramic braces?

Yes. You can have ceramic braces on your top teeth for esthetic purposes and metal braces on your bottom teeth for economical purposes.
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13.Are ceramic braces more expensive than metal braces?

Yes. Ceramic braces are slightly more expensive than metal braces.
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14.Can teenagers use ceramic braces like most adults prefer for esthetic reasons?

Yes. They can use either ceramic or metal braces.
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15.Is the appointment for getting braces a painful or an uncomfortable one?

No. The procedures themselves to bond braces to the teeth are not painful. Braces are attached to teeth in a similar manner that stickers maybe attached to teeth. We also make sure that we take the time to explain everything that will take place as it’s occurring to ensure patient comfort. Nothing will be a surprise.
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16.Do I need shots to get braces on? or during orthodontic treatment?

No. Shots are not necessary in orthodontic treatment.
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17.Do braces hurt?

Generally, braces do not "hurt." After certain visits, teeth may be sore for a few days. In these situations, pain medications such as Advil or Tylenol will ease the discomfort. However, after most visits, patients do not feel any soreness at all! We often remind our patients, “It does not have to hurt to work!”
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18.Can I return to school they day I receive my braces?

Yes. There is no reason to miss school because of an orthodontic appointment.
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19.Are there foods that I can not eat while I have braces?

Yes. Once treatment begins, we will explain the complete instructions and provide a comprehensive list of foods to avoid or consume food differently by cutting into small bite size pieces for example. Some of those foods include: ice, hard candy, raw vegetables and all sticky foods (i.e. caramel and taffy). You can avoid most emergency appointments to repair broken or damaged braces by carefully following our instructions.
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20.How often should I brush my teeth while in braces?

Patients should brush their teeth at least three times each day - after each meal and before going to bed. Our highly trained staff will show you how to brush and floss their teeth with braces.
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21.Should I use electric toothbrush with braces? Will electric toothbrush break my braces?

We encourage you to use an electric tooth brush particularly during orthodontic treatment. You may continue to use either the regular tooth brush inserts or use the ones made for braces. Electric tooth brush will not break your braces.
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22.How often will I have appointments?

In general, orthodontic adjustments are needed every 4 to 6 weeks to optimize treatment duration and keep it as short as possible. If there are specific situations that require more frequent monitoring, we will schedule appointments accordingly.
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23.How long will it take to complete my treatment?

Treatment time obviously depends on each patient’s specific orthodontic needs. In general, treatment time lasts from 8 months to 30 months. The "average" time frame a person is in braces is approximately 18-24 months with excellent cooperation on their part. New technology such as Propel used at our office, result in shorter treatment time without compromising quality.
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24.Do braces interfere with my school activities like sports, playing an instrument or singing?

Playing an instrument or a contact sport may require some adjustment when you first get your braces, but wearing braces will not stop you from participating in any of your school activities. If you play a contact sport, it is recommended that you wear a mouthguard to protect your braces or appliance. There are special mouth guards that go over braces that we can provide to you at our office since over the counter mouth guards will break your braces.
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25.What is invisalign?

Invisalign is a series of removable aligners that are custom made for each patient to move their teeth. These movements are decided according to the treatment goals that we determine based on your smile goals and our recommendations.
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26.Can Invisalign treat the same problems that braces can treat?

No. Invisalign is a much more limited appliance than braces are. As a result, Invisalign can not be used for most orthodontic patients even though it can be used for several orthodontic patients.
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27.How do I know if I am an Invisalign candidate?

At your initial examination we will always list all of your treatment options and appliances options. We will inform you if you are a candidate for treatment with both invisalign or braces and confirm if you are not a candidate for one of the appliances.
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28.Can I be treated with both braces and Invisalign simultaneously?

Yes. At times we can treat with the combination of both systems and we are happy to do so. Not all orthodontic problems need braces. For example, if your upper teeth can be treated with invisalign but your lower teeth can not, we will always let you know so you can choose for yourself which appliance you prefer.
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29.What is Propel Technology?

Propel is a simple, in-office procedure used to stimulate alveolar bone to allow teeth to move faster. There is zero recovery time and the patients are able to return to their normal daily routine immediately. The procedure is indicated for approximately 80%of patients receiving orthodontictreatment. Propel can be used with braces and with Invisalign.
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30.Do I need retainers after my orthodontic treatment?

Yes. Teeth will always relapse to their original position and retainers prevent that from happening.
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31.How long do I have to wear retainers for?

The ideal regimen for retainer use for most cases is to use retainers full time the first year out of orthodontic treatment. The second year after braces retainers should be used every night. There after, removable retainers have to be used 3-4 nights per week indefinitely to maintain what the orthodontic treatment has accomplished for you.
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32.What are my retainer type options?

We offer all retainer types both removable and fixed retainers. At the end of your treatment we will give you our recommendation for the type of retainer that suites the problems we corrected for you. In addition together with your input we’ll determine which retainer fits your life style the best in order to make your retention phase very easy for you.
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33.How much will braces cost? Are financing options available? How does insurance work?

It is impossible to give an exact cost for treatment until we have examined your needs. We will cover the exact cost and financial plans that we offer during the initial examination appointment. We will review these with you. We will also review your insurance policy and help to maximize your benefit and file your claims.
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34.Do you use recycled braces?

Absolutely not! It is our belief that each patient should be provided with their own braces to achieve the best orthodontic result possible.
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35.Can I schedule all of my appointments after school?

Unfortunately, we cannot schedule all appointments for students during after-school hours. However, we do provide early evening hours on a weekly basis and school notes. We will, however, make a sincere effort to meet your scheduling needs.
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36.Do you offer after 5pm appointments?

Yes. Our office holds adjustment appointments on every Monday until 6:30pm.
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37.Can I drop my child off for an appointment?

Yes. We understand your busy schedule, and we are happy to help you make the most of your time. On some occasions, we may request to speak with a parent when they return, so we ask that parents check in with their patient manager before dropping off their child.
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38.Will I need to have teeth extracted for braces?

Removing teeth is sometimes required to achieve the best orthodontic result. Straight teeth, an ideal bite, and a balanced facial profile are the goal of orthodontics.
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39.Will my child need an expander? Will my child need a headgear?

At the completion of the initial examination, we will determine whether a patient needs an expander and or a headgear.
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40.Will I need to use elastics/rubber bands during my orthodontic treatment?

Most orthodontic treatment require various auxiliaries one of which are removable elastics. Elastics help the braces move the teeth and as such accomplish treatment goals and shorten treatment time.
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41.What is an emergency appointment? How are those handled?

If your braces are causing extreme pain or if something breaks, you should call our office. In most cases, we can address these issues over the telephone. If you require an emergency appointment, we will set aside time for you.
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42.Do I need to see my family dentist while in braces or Invisalign?

Yes. Regular checkups with your family dentist are important while in braces. Your family dentist will determine the intervals between cleaning appointments while you are in braces. At the minimum very 6 months cleaning appointments and examination by your dentist is required during orthodontic treatment.
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43.Do teeth straighten out as they grow?

In general when once all permanent teeth are present teeth will not straighten out on their own., They can straighten out on their own during the initially changing of some baby teeth to permanent teeth and not when all permanent teeth have erupted.
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44.Can orthodontic treatment be done while a child still has baby teeth?

Yes. Some orthodontic problems are significant enough to require early intervention to protect the permanent teeth that have erupted while multiple baby teeth still remain. However, if a patient is not yet ready for treatment, we will follow that patient's growth and development until the time is right for treatment to begin.
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45.What is Phase One (Early) Treatment?

Phase One treatment, if necessary, is usually initiated on children between the ages of 7 and 10. Phase One treatment usually lasts about 8-12 months on average. The primary objective for Phase One treatment is to address significant problems that are either causing irreversible problems or with continued unfavorable growth cause future problems if left untreated. In rare cases will our office recommend Phase One treatment driven by esthetic reasons unless parents and the kids inform us of their intent to do treatment for esthetic reasons which can be equally important in respect to self-esteem.
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46.Will my child need full braces if he/she has phase one treatment done at a younger age?

In general, most Phase One treatment cases will require full braces. This is because the two treatments are separate from each other. The phase I treatment is done to intercept an existing problem that can not wait to be treated later when the patient is ready for full braces treatment. Throughout Phase One period, and afterwards parents and patients will be kept informed of future treatment recommendations if any.
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47.Can another orthodontist continue my orthodontic treatment with the same braces if I move?

Depending on how far along you are in your orthodontic treatment the answer will vary. In general, if only a few months remain of your orthodontic treatment then the answer is yes. Otherwise, chances are high that your existing braces need to be removed and the new orthodontist braces need to be used. Different orthodontists use braces with different “prescriptions”. There are many orthodontic techniques and they each use different size wires. As a result, your new orthodontist wires may not match your braces.
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48.Is it too late to have braces if I am already an adult?

No patient is "too old" to wear braces! As long as the teeth, gums and bone are in healthy condition they can be moved. Health, happiness and self-esteem are vitally important to adults. A pleasantly surprising percentage of our patients are adults. In fact, 25 percent of all orthodontic patients are adults especially with advances in technology.
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49.Can I wear braces even though I have crowns, root canals, and missing teeth?

Yes. A tooth with a crown or a root canal will move just like a tooth with a simple filling. When teeth are missing, orthodontic treatment will aid in the alignment of the remaining teeth.
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50.Can I get my braces off before my treatment is completed?

Yes. All of our patients are a dynamic part of our practice and we respect your wishes and needs. We understand that goals change and that life also takes turns. In general we advise that you complete your treatment recommendations to fully benefit from the orthodontic treatment. Your signature on our early braces removal form gives us permission to remove your braces before attaining treatment goals, as long as you are 18 years or older.
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Some pointers for you on emergency care and general soreness with braces.
EMERGENCY CARE

True orthodontic emergencies are rare, but when they occur we are available to you. As a general rule, you should call our office when you experience severe pain or have a painful appliance problem that you are unable to take care of by yourself. We'll be able to schedule an appointment to resolve the problem.

You might be surprised to learn that you may be able to solve many problems yourself temporarily until you can get to our office. If your braces are poking you, put soft wax on the piece that's sticking out. Use the wax that we provided you at the beginning of your treatment, or if it’s not accessible to you immediately pharmacies also have them. If the wire has slid to one side, you can pull it back to the other side with tweezers, placing it in the tube on the back tooth.

After alleviating your discomfort, it is very important that you still call our office as soon as possible to schedule a time to repair the problem. Allowing your appliance to remain damaged for an extended period of time may result in disruptions to your treatment.

 

GENERAL SORENESS

When you get your braces on, you may feel general soreness in your mouth, and teeth may be tender to biting pressures for three to five days. Maintain a soft food diet until your teeth do not hurt when chewing. Irritated gums and other sore spots can be relieved by rinsing your mouth with a warm salt-water mouthwash. Dissolve one teaspoonful of salt in eight ounces of warm water, and rinse your mouth vigorously. An alternative is the Healthy Gums Rinse by The Natural Dentist.

Placing Orabase on the affected area may also help relieve discomfort. Orabase can be found over the counter in a pharmacy. If the tenderness is severe, take Acetaminophen (Tylenol) or whatever you normally take for headache or similar pain. Aspirin, Ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil) and Naproxen Sodium (Naprosyn, Anaprox) actually slow the tooth movement, so it is not advisable to use them frequently while wearing braces.

The lips, cheeks, and tongue may become irritated for one to two weeks as they become accustomed to the surface of the braces. In the meanwhile, you can put wax on the braces to lessen this. We’ll show you how!

1. When should I take my child to the dentist for the first check-up?

2. What should I tell my child before the First visit?

3. When and how do I clean my baby’s teeth?

4. What is ‘baby bottle tooth decay'? how can it be avoided?

5. Are baby teeth really that important to my child?

6. What should I do if my child has a toothache?

7. Are thumbsucking and pacifier habits harmful for a child's teeth?

8. How can I prevent decay caused by nursing?

9. How often does my child need to see the pediatric dentist?

10. Toothpaste: when should we begin using it and how much should we use?

11. How do I make my child's diet safe for his teeth?

12. How do dental sealants work?

13. How do I know if my child is getting enough fluoride?

14. What can I do to protect my child's teeth during sporting events?

15. What should I do if my child falls and knocks out a permanent tooth?

16. How safe are dental X-rays?

17. How can parents help prevent tooth decay?


1.When should I take my child to the dentist for the first check-up?

In order to prevent dental problems, your child should see a pediatric dentist when the first tooth appears, or no later than his/her first birthday.
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2.What should I tell my child before the First visit?

You can explain to your child that the dentist wants to be a friend and help care for his or her teeth. At the first visit, explain to your child that the dentist will count their teeth, clean them with a special tickling toothbrush, and take some pictures. Avoid using terms such as needles, shots, pain or hurt – this may never have entered your child’s mind as a possibility! Instead, reassure your child that the dentist is friendly, helpful and kind.
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3.When and how do I clean my baby’s teeth?

At PoshOrtho we stress the importance of starting healthy habits early. From the moment you bring your baby home, start cleaning your baby’s mouth even if he/she doesn’t have teeth. You can clean his/her gums and tongue with moistened gauze, cloth or a silicone rubber fingertip toothbrush during bath-time. When you’re child’s first tooth erupts, a toothbrush will remove bacteria that can lead to decay. Any soft-bristled toothbrush with a small head, preferably one designed specifically for infants, should be used at least twice a day, but especially at bedtime. Children often do not have the manual dexterity needed to effectively clean their teeth, for this reason, we recommend brushing for your child until they are 8 years of age and flossing for them until they are 10 years of age. Speak to the doctors at PoshOrtho to learn more about fluoridated toothpaste and supplements. Supervised home care is essential in maintaining your child’s optimal oral health.
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4.What is ‘baby bottle tooth decay'? how can it be avoided?

Baby bottle tooth decay (also called early childhood caries and nursing caries) occurs when a baby’s teeth are in frequent contact with sugars (fruit juices, milk, formula, flavored water, soda or any other sweet drink). The bacteria in a baby’s mouth break down the sugar in these liquids producing acid that causes tooth decay. If left untreated, decayed teeth can cause pain and make it difficult to chew and eat. If baby teeth are decayed, become infected or are lost early, they can cause harm to developing teeth and can’t help guide the permanent teeth into their proper position. Badly decayed baby teeth can become severely infected with the possibility of that infection spreading elsewhere. Children should not be permitted to take a bottle to bed. Ideally, children should be weaned from the bottle by 12 months of age. Additionally, a ‘sippy cup’ should only be used to transition your child from the bottle to the cup. Scheduling your child’s first dental visit at Sporting Smiles by their first birthday is a great opportunity to learn how to keep your child happy, healthy and cavity free.
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5.Are baby teeth really that important to my child?

Primary, or "baby," teeth are important for many reasons. Not only do they help children speak clearly and chew naturally, they also aid in forming a path that permanent teeth can follow when they are ready to erupt.
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6.What should I do if my child has a toothache?

First, rinse the irritated area with warm salt water and place a cold compress on the face if it is swollen. Give the child acetaminophen for any pain, rather than placing aspirin on the teeth or gums. Finally, see a dentist as soon as possible.
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7.Are thumbsucking and pacifier habits harmful for a child's teeth?

Thumb and pacifier sucking habits will generally only become a problem if they go on for a very long period of time. Most children stop these habits on their own, but if they are still sucking their thumbs or fingers past the age of three, a mouth appliance may be recommended by your pediatric dentist.
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8.How can I prevent decay caused by nursing?

Avoid nursing children to sleep or putting anything other than water in their bed-time bottle. Also, learn the proper way to brush and floss your child's teeth. Take your child to a pediatric dentist regularly to have his/her teeth and gums checked. The first dental visit should be scheduled by your child's first birthday.
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9.How often does my child need to see the pediatric dentist?

A check-up every six months is recommended in order prevent cavities and other dental problems. However, your pediatric dentist can tell you when and how often your child should visit based on their personal oral health.
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10.Toothpaste: when should we begin using it and how much should we use?

The sooner the better! Starting at birth, clean your child’s gums with a soft infant toothbrush or cloth and water. Parents should use a tiny smear of fluoride toothpaste to brush baby teeth twice daily as soon as they erupt and a soft, age-appropriate sized toothbrush. Once children are 3 to 6 years old, then the amount should be increased to a pea-size dollop and perform or assist your child’s toothbrushing. Remember that young children do not have the ability to brush their teeth effectively. Children should spit out and not swallow excess toothpaste after brushing.
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11.How do I make my child's diet safe for his teeth?

Make sure your child has a balanced diet, including one serving each of: fruits and vegetables, breads and cereals, milk and dairy products, and meat fish and eggs. Limiting the servings of sugars and starches will also aid in protecting your child's teeth from decay. You can also ask your pediatric dentist to help you select foods that protect your children's teeth.
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12.How do dental sealants work?

Sealants work by filling in the crevasses on the chewing surfaces of the teeth. This shuts out food particles that could get caught in the teeth, causing cavities. The application is fast and comfortable and can effectively protect teeth for many years.
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13.How do I know if my child is getting enough fluoride?

Have your pediatric dentist evaluate the fluoride level of your child's primary source of drinking water. If your child is not getting enough fluoride internally through water (especially if the fluoride level is deficient or if your child drinks bottled water without fluoride), then your pediatric dentist may prescribe fluoride supplements.
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14.What can I do to protect my child's teeth during sporting events?

Soft plastic mouthguards can be used to protect a child's teeth, lips, cheeks and gums from sport related injuries. A custom-fitted mouthguard developed by a pediatric dentist will protect your child from injuries to the teeth, face and even provide protection from severe injuries to the head.
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15.What should I do if my child falls and knocks out a permanent tooth?

The most important thing to do is to remain calm. Then find the tooth. Hold it by the crown rather than the root and try to reinsert it in the socket. If that is not possible, put the tooth in a glass of milk and take your child and the glass immediately to the pediatric dentist.
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16.How safe are dental X-rays?

There is very little risk in dental X-rays. Pediatric dentists are especially careful to limit the amount of radiation to which children are exposed. Lead aprons and high-speed film are used to ensure safety and minimize the amount of radiation.
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17.How can parents help prevent tooth decay?

Parents should take their children to the dentist regularly, beginning with the eruption of the first tooth. Then, the dentist can recommend a specific program of brushing, flossing, and other treatments for parents to supervise and teach to their children. These home treatments, when added to regular dental visits and a balanced diet, will help give your child a lifetime of healthy habits.
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